I Don’t Always Have Spina Bifida

 

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Photo courtesy Macbeth Photography: MacbethPhoto.com
 My life consists of many awesome events…and many funny photos! 

 

 

Yes, I know. That’s quite the inflammatory title.

This is a topic I’ve been reflecting on for a long time. I’ve read many articles and posts on both sides of this argument. I’ve read posts from adults with spina bifida, and parents of children with spina bifida, who say that spina bifida doesn’t define them. 

I’ve also seen the other side of the coin, from parents who say that, indeed, spina bifida defines their children. 

One of the most interesting arguments I’ve heard for the latter point of view is from my friend, Mary Evelyn. Even when I don’t agree with her perspective 100 percent, she always manages to make a very sound, introspective and rational case. I can’t help but agree with her on this– to a certain degree. 

To be sure, even now, in writing this, I am on the fence on this subject.

Mary Evelyn, and all of those who agree with her, is right. To a certain extent, spina bifida will always define me and my life. It’s an integral part of who and what I am. I will never be able to shrug off the years, nay, decades, of how spina bifida has molded me into the person I am. The adult I am. 

But there is another side of this coin, I ardently believe, that deserves equal inspection. There are moments, even days, when I don’t feel like I have spina bifida. 

Do you know what I’m talking about? Whether you have spina bifida or not, perhaps you can relate.

I’m talking about those moments when I’m getting ready to go out, and I’m putting the finishing touches on my outfit– my earrings, my eyeliner, etc. I glance at myself in the full-length mirror, and I see…a beautiful woman. Not “a woman with spina bifida.” Not “a woman who has had several brain surgeries.” Not “a woman who is now struggling with lower back pain on a daily basis.” Not “a woman who has to self-cath every three hours in order to live.”

Just…a beautiful woman. 

When I’m out with my closest girlfriends, and having a glass of sangria or a cup of coffee, it’s not the woman with spina bifida they are out with. It’s the blogger, the social media consultant, the coffeeholic (more often than not), the grammar nazi who is constantly editing other people’s words as well as her own (I seriously can’t help it!).

 

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Other times, it’s the flirt (sometimes) who wants to get that cute server’s attention, or the wise counselor, when a girlfriend is struggling with a problem (I’m really obsessed with analyzing everyone’s problems, including my own!), or the goofball.

 

Goats*That awkward moment* at Disney when you can’t figure out why the goats love you so much…and later on you find the bag of edamame in your purse. -_-

 

 

 

In fact, when I’m among my closest friends, spina bifida is a topic that is introduced very rarely. I think, by this point, most of them acknowledge it in passing, the way you would acknowledge a person’s eye or hair color, or stature.

I’m also just as protective of my friends as they are of me…sometimes I’m the “older sister,” and sometimes they are. It just depends on the situation.

That isn’t to say that I feel ashamed of having spina bifida…but it does make me uncomfortable to be around people who barely know me and already feel the need to pepper me with a dozen questions I might not feel like answering at a networking event. Sometimes, I’ve made an unconscious decision to remove that particular hat for the evening…and that’s okay. I feel entitled to that. 

I’ll always be an advocate for the spina bifida cause. That won’t change anytime soon, I’m pretty sure. I’m committed to it, because I understand it. 

But if I paused to dwell on spina bifida every day, every moment, every second when I’m getting dressed or putting on makeup, or picking out my earrings…well, then, I’d never make it out the door on time.

I’ll Show You My Reasons

 

Author’s Note: This post was written in October 2013. Over a year later, I still feel this way. Thank God Nicholas made a full recovery from his injuries described below. But his and my family– as well as so many other families– continue to wait for hope. We wait for awareness. 

 

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October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month. We’ve just made it past the half-way mark, and already I’m feeling like a broken record. 

I’m angry. I’m sad. I’m frustrated. I feel helpless. And all because it’s October. 

October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month. 

It’s also Everything Else Month. 

I’m not angry at the other causes– breast cancer, down syndrome, domestic violence– how could I be? They are valid, serious causes, every bit as worthy and deserving as spina bifida of being recognized and honored and supported, not just in October, but every month. 

I’m angry because the excuse that many people give to not support the Spina Bifida Cause is because they are busy supporting these other causes. 

I’m angry because they don’t get it

I’m angry because they believe spina bifida is less serious. Less worthy. Less important. 

On Monday, I visited Nicholas in the hospital. Nicholas is an eight-year-old boy with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. 

Last week, he was the victim of an unexpected, traumatic and heartbreaking incident when he was attacked in a park. While I won’t go into the details here, because it’s a situation that has caused his family– and all of their friends and loved ones– so much pain, suffice it to say he suffered two concussions and began having frequent seizures. 

These seizures could be enough to cause him irreversible brain damage. He already has developmental and speech delays because of the many neurosurgeries he’s had. 

How is Nicholas doing now? Thank God, he’s out of the hospital, as of last night. I’ve been in frequent contact with his mom, Cheryl, who is my very dear friend and who slept at his side every night in the hospital. According to her, his seizures are now under control, but only time will tell if he will get back all of his cognitive functions.

He’s not himself right now, she told me. Indeed, when I went to see him on Monday, the usually cheerful, calm eight-year-old was impatient– he even walked right out of the hospital room at one point, determined to visit the playroom. When he didn’t get his way, he growled and screamed unintelligibly, clearly frustrated.

Cheryl noted that he never behaves this way. She misses her sweet little Angel. 

There was one moment that stood out in a positive way for all of us, when a young hospital volunteer stopped by to perform magic tricks.

Nicholas lit up. His mother, and all of us that were in the room with them, watched in amazement as Nicholas even verbalized what he was feeling. He wanted to know “how he did that” when he demonstrated a trick. He walked right over to the young man and did not take his eyes off him the entire time. 

Watching him was, indeed, magic. 

Of course, many causes will demand your attention– this month, and every month. All of these are important, and we should take the time to learn as much as we can to help those we love– and ourselves– prevent illnesses and other devastating circumstances.

But, to a child living with spina bifida– and to the family that cares for him or her– often, there is no frame of reference outside of spina bifida. Sometimes, there is no escaping the uncertainty and pain that comes from knowing that someone you love is suffering. 

There are plenty of moments, like the one we witnessed with Nicholas, when you get a glimpse of hope, of recovery, of that return to the simple joys of childhood as it should be.

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Happier times. Celebrating my birthday 2 years ago with Nicholas and his family– dad Jerran, mom Cheryl, and big brother Daniel.

But spina bifida complicates things. They can turn even the most common illnesses and injuries into a nightmare. Sometimes, we lose hope. 

During those moments, we try to choose to hold on to the moments we’ve enjoyed– the moments that make us laugh out loud, even through tears. The trivial moments. Sometimes one trivial moment can matter more than 1,000 serious moments.

But, my anger remains unassuaged. People still dare to question why this matters to me. 

I can only think of one good reason: 

Because I’ve been there, too. 

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Just days after I was born. The battle to survive and thrive with spina bifida begins almost immediately after birth for most of us.

 

BlogHer was very gracious in allowing me to share my story with their many followers! Please read, comment, share my post, and let BlogHer know that we need more stories about spina bifida awareness. 

Love,

Laurita

Top 5 Moments & Lessons at Top Blogueras Retreat 2013: UNited & UNdefeated

 

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Above photo courtesy of Myrna Calderón.

 

 

I’m not going to lie to you. (You should know that by now!) The past few weeks for me have involved stress, tears, joy, excitement, more tears, and fears of developing a hernia. That’s usually what happens when I get sandwiched between conferences.

But I did it. I managed to attend the LATISM ’13 conference exactly a week after experiencing my first Hispana Leadership Summit in Orlando– and I also was honored to be invited to attend the second annual LATISM Top Blogueras Retreat in-between!

When it comes to attending conferences, my philosophy has evolved over time. I used to engage in the practice of grabbing an agenda first-thing, then circling and highlighting all of the sessions I wanted to attend.

I have long since abandoned that practice, because the idea of planning ahead for anything just seems ludicrous to me now. There’s the plan, and then there’s reality. 

The reality, I’ve learned, is the far better plan! 

Such was the recurring theme of my five nights in New York City. So, without further ado, I’m sharing some experiences and lessons I acquired during the first part of my adventure, The Top Blogueras Retreat and visit to the United Nations.

 

 

1. Eating out in New York with 100 of your hermanas is, in fact, material for a sit-com. 

During our first night together after all the Top Blogueras arrived, we headed over to Havana Central in Times Square– I think. Because I don’t think any of us knew for sure where we were going, LOL! We had to take taxis in very small groups, obviously, so when I got to the restaurant, I thought, “this isn’t too crowded. Maybe not everyone is here.”

About a half-hour later, our posse was still arriving– in droves. We took over the entire back section of the restaurant. It was awesome. 

Everyone is cramped at these long tables, everyone is talking at once, and it’s doubtful that any of us were actually listening to each other. We were just way too excited to all be together, and in one of Manhattan’s hottest restaurants, no less! 

That night, in my mind, was the perfect way to herald our arrival in New York City– Cuban food, drinks, girlfriends, and chatter. I wouldn’t have had it any other way.

 

 

2. Whether you attend the official conference sessions or not, you will get advice, you will get schooled, and you will get “tough love.” 

I barely had time, between stopping in the hallways to chat and catch up with amigas, to attend every session during the retreat. But, no worries! This event is all about Latina empowerment– and all about putting yourself and your needs first. For me, I needed those one-on-one chats, where the person I need to speak with has my full attention, and I can ask questions and we’re engaging each other. 

I got some sound, personalized advice from a financial guru right out in the hall (thanks, Francesca, for pulling me aside for that invaluable opportunity!), and he turned out to be an amazing man who is, himself, using his social power to effect positive change in the world. I’ll never forget my conversation with him.

During the retreat, one of my fellow health blogueras, Laura Termini, pulled me aside (that happened to me a lot last week!) and gave me some hard advice that I really needed to hear. She encouraged me to seize my potential and truly put it to use for the good of my mission. I can never thank her enough for lighting a fire under my feet! 😉

 

 

3. The United Nations is a global force for good that we all should be connecting and engaging with. They are awesome. 

When I heard we were getting an exclusive tour of the United Nations headquarters, I thought for sure it would be a stuffy, uninspired building with official seals stamped everywhere.

I could never have imagined it would be so beautiful, like visiting a museum or art gallery. The works of art that adorn these halls and majestic meeting rooms are an amazing testimony to the multicultural, multi-national mission that the U.N. promotes. Many works– ranging from paintings to murals, from tapestries to sculptures– have been donated by member nations. 

During an increasingly-hostile political climate in the U.S., which is seeing escalating vitriol towards people of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds, it was so reassuring to see firsthand how the U.N. embraces and promotes diversity, even in its décor.

 

4. International organizations, including the U.N., not only need to hear from us– they want to hear from us! 

During our briefing with officials that work with the U.N. at the Ford Foundation headquarters, we listened to speakers discuss the diverse issues that the U.N. is particularly concerned about– access to food, water, health care for all; education; sustainability, etc.

They repeatedly encouraged us to Tweet the U.N., especially during this week, which is the Social Good Summit and the U.N. is convening in New York City. The hashtag is #2030NOW, and the U.N. wants to motivate users to Tweet what they’d like to see happen by the year 2030.

I’m using my voice and my platform to make the public aware of how many Ob-Gyns are pressuring expectant parents of child with spina bifida or another condition, to abortThis is WRONG. When a parent makes an informed decision based on the perceived best interest of his/her family, that is one thing; but when a medical doctor entrusted with the care of mother and baby is insensitive to the vulnerable position that family is in, that is pure, unadulterated manipulation. Parents have the right to get impartial, objective but compassionate information from their health care providers about spina bifida, and all of their options. 

The fact that many medical doctors (Ob-Gyns, specifically, who will only deliver a baby and not go on to “treat” him/her) still push an aggressive agenda of eugenic abortion is a tragedy. It’s a tragedy, not from a pro-life or pro-choice perspective, but rather because the family is being deprived of knowing what’s possible for this child. 

So, if you agree that doctors coercing a family to abort is wrong, please join me in Tweeting and using the hashtag #2030Now to try to bring an end to eugenic abortions (in the U.S., too!) 

 

5. When you’re with familia, it doesn’t matter what you’re doing! You’ll have fun doing it. 

The Top Blogueras and the LATISM Sports Tennis Team were invited to the Billie Jean King USTA National Tennis Center (home of the U.S. Open!) to meet and play with a group of kids with Big Brothers, Big Sisters. Unfortunately, due to several buses breaking down, the children weren’t able to meet with us. :(

We were devastated that we all missed out on the opportunity to get together for some fun, but we did have some undisputed fun on the train ride over to the tennis center! 😉

Check out this short instagram video to see what I mean.

 

 

 

Well, that’s all for now in this edition of Holdin’ Out for a Hero. Please stay tuned as I’ll be working on another recap on the conference itself! Thanks a million, LATISM, for believing in me and choosing me to be among so many ladies that I admire and respect!

Hugs,

 

Laurita ♥

The Best Family Heirlooms: ALLERGYFACE™

This post is part of a sponsored campaign on behalf of Latina Bloggers Connect and the makers of ZYRTEC®.

 

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Let’s face it. Perhaps one of the worst things that can happen to our daily beauty routine is allergies. They give us runny, red noses, puffy, watery eyes and face, and general low self-esteem.

But many of these allergy annoyances are no match for anyone with a good makeup kit! Blogger Carmen Ordoñez of Viva Fashion has a personal motto: “You can look great without breaking the bank.” 

And this applies to all of us who occasionally suffer from ALLERGYFACE™.

I come from a long, proud line of allergy sufferers. My allergy lineage can be traced back three generations!

My Abuelita has always been prone to severe allergies– of every kind. Even a simple activity such as going out in the yard to garden, which she loves, could trigger a reaction that would render her looking like a cooked lobster.

My Mami and I are also sensitive to the sun, though not quite as badly as poor Abuelita. This is why Mami always recommends using sunblock before going out and catching some rays.

Other products my Mami and I both can’t live without are makeup for sensitive skin (concealer, foundation, blush, eyeshadow, etc.)

Also, it’s important to remember to remove makeup completely before going to bed. Even the slightest bit of eyeshadow or eyeliner residue can be enough to trigger itchy, watery, red eyes.

Carmen Ordoñez also features some more great tips for combating ALLERGYFACE™ in her second YouTube installment, “Generations of Beauty Advice.” (Watch it here!) 

Also, while beauty tips are fabulous, it’s critical not to forget about the health aspect of this.  If you know you are prone to allergies, you should do everything you can to prevent the onset of an episode. Just in case, it wouldn’t hurt to carry antihistamine. (I even carry an epinephrine injection in my purse! It’s better to be safe than sorry.)


Some beauty tips can be more valuable than the most expensive heirlooms. What advice has been passed down in your family that can help fight ALLERGYFACE™? 

10 Things About Me That Might Shock You

Okay, I really, really didn’t want to have to do this. Don’t get me wrong– I think some people’s naiveté is so gosh darn cute!

But lately, I’ve seen an onslaught of “disability is so-frickin’-inspiring” stories that have made me roll my eyes and, sometimes, want to log out of my computer for a while. :(

So, whether you’re ready for it or not, here’s the truth– the brutal truth. Granted, some of it may upset you, but I’m okay with that.

 

1. I don’t cry myself to sleep at night, lamenting that I have spina bifida. 

I hate to break it to you, but most nights, I crash into bed and sleep, non-stop, for eight hours or so, after either blogging till the wee hours of the morning, or watching a funny video or doing something else that helps me unwind. So do many of my non-spina bifida peers.

 

2.  I drink. 

Yep. I don’t mean the “stumbling-out-of-Walgreens-at-3-a.m.-after-buying-a-cart-full-of-junk-food-and-tuna-fish” drinking, but yes, I drink socially. I always drink with trusted friends, or family members around. I never put myself in situations where the person I’m riding with has been drinking. That’s just not cool.

 

3. I don’t just automatically become BFFs with everyone who has spina bifida, like me. 

It just doesn’t work that way. I love connecting with others with spina bifida, of course, and many people do befriend me after visiting my blog. But I don’t necessarily “click” with everyone who has spina bifida, and that’s fine. It would be like saying, “all Latinos have to get along,” or “all African-Americans have to get along.” Are you kidding me? What century is this?

 

4. I have many friends who don’t have what is perceived as a “disability,” and we have a great time together. 

I’ve been blessed to meet people at so many different events and conferences. Most of them have very different characteristics, and you can’t lump them into one category. I love that! When I meet people for the first time who only know me through blogging/social media circles, I am often struck by how insignificant my “disability” is to them. It’s because they met me online first, without seeing the wheelchair or other things that people might otherwise see first. They value me for my qualities, and I value them for theirs. We have intellectual conversations. We have inside jokes. We have a true bond.

 

Coffee = Bliss. :)

 

5. While romantic love would be nice, I don’t necessarily seek out people “just like me” as potential partners. 

Yep, it’s true. Believe it! I don’t aspire to a “matchy-matchy” relationship where my partner has spina bifida just like me. I look at intellect, personality, common interests and future goals as criteria for potential partners, and not their physical abilities/disabilities. I expect the same from a potential partner, too. I don’t want to be disqualified because of a perceived “disability.” It’s always a mystery why certain couples are attracted to each other. I don’t think I’m supposed to question why “some opposites attract” and others don’t. Please, don’t question me, either.

 

6. I can open doors, tie my own shoes, go to the bathroom on my own, fix myself a sandwich, etc. etc. 

While my cooking abilities are still questionable (LOL!), I do a lot of things for myself, on my own. And I’m still learning. Aren’t we all?

 

7. I can probably out-spell and out-edit you, or anyone you know. 

Writing is my thing. Spelling and grammar are also “my things,” I suppose. Name the time and place. Chuck Norris and I will be waiting.

 

8. I use a wheelchair part-time, when needed. And hardly ever inside the house. But I can dance like nobody’s business. 

I’m not talking Gangnam Style here, but I like to think I can salsa dance circles around most people. 😀

 

9. I suck at giving directions. No seriously, I can’t find my way out of a paper bag. 

During road trips where my father asks me to read a map, I usually toss the map away and reach for Google Maps on my iPhone. Siri is becoming my best friend, a.k.a. navigational device.

 

10. I don’t just think about the spina bifida cause 24-7. There are so many wonderful causes that deserve my attention. 

I love social good, and I have a feeling that I live for social good. Whether it’s through a blog post, a Tweet, a Facebook update, or a donation, I enjoy supporting many different causes. I feel strongly about supporting LGBT rights, charities that give to the poor, the homeless, the hungry, and organizations that help children and adults with different chronic conditions. I think social media provides us with some of the best tools ever to support and spread the word about great causes. It’s awesome, because social media makes it easy for us, so we don’t have to choose just one cause to throw all our support to.

 

 **Bonus Tip/Fact: If you ever need a favor from me, try bribing me with coffee.

Nine times out of 10, it works. And the other 10 percent of the time is unaccounted for. I just made it up. 😉

 

 

Awareness: The End, Not the Means

When I set out to be captain of my own team again for the SBACFL Walk-N-Roll for Spina Bifida, I never imagined just how many people my humble efforts would reach– in Central Florida, as well as beyond.

On Wednesday night, Chantilly Patiño of Multicultural Familia and Bicultural Mom moderated our very first Walk-N-Roll Twitter Party for Spina Bifida.

An unprecedented online event meant to raise both funds and awareness, we managed to raise $120 for the Spina Bifida Association of Central Florida. More importantly–we did raise awareness. During this Twitter party, the hashtag #SpinaBifida had nearly 2 million impressions! This is a huge leap forward for the spina bifida cause.

I could never thank Chantilly and all the sponsors and co-hosts enough for all their hard work and dedication to this cause. I’m truly moved by everyone’s show of support. I was also amazed by how many joined the conversation– both people who had been touched by spina bifida, and people who knew nothing of spina bifida before this event. Both groups alike joined forces for this effort, and I will always be grateful to all of them.

On Thursday evening, I hosted another event– in person, at Bravo! Cucina Italiana, here in Orlando. Proceeds from ticket sales benefited the SBACFL Walk-N-Roll for Spina Bifida.

An intimate crowd joined us in support of The Cause, including two families who are part of the SBACFL. A special thanks to Amanda Kern, who took some beautiful photos of the event.

 

 

 Why, oh why did I have my eyes closed for this one? An otherwise beautiful family portrait, taken by the ever-attentive Bravo staff.

 

Bravo! Cucina Italiana General Manager Michael Monahan was the one who made it all happen that evening. Thank you so much for caring about the Spina Bifida community! :)


*SIGH* At every event I attend or host, I have to put up with another of Mami’s gratuitous photo shoots. #Mamarazzi

 


Our friend Giancarlo came to support our event!

 

My good friends Brett and Krystal also came out to support me! Love them.

I’m always grateful for Vionet-Edith’s support. She’s a true friend…part of the family. :)

Attendees were greeted by an assortment of appetizers and enjoyed drinks on the terrace. We couldn’t have prayed for better weather!

Speaking of prayers…my beloved priest, Father Bassam, was there to support me and my family.

 

 

I was able to share special moments with other people, including a camera crew from the UCF Cornerstone program. These college students from my alma mater are volunteering for New Hope for Kids, another one of my favorite organizations, and they showed up to interview me about my experience as a wish recipient!

 

 (There’s more photos where that came from! Stay tuned. :)  )

 

Another priceless moment that evening was reuniting with Amanda’s son Chance. Now 20 months old, this incredible little guy has touched so many lives already. Ever since the first time I met him over a year ago, I’ve felt a very strong connection to him. He is definitely very special to me. I love Super Chance! :)

(Note: All the following photos are courtesy of AmandaKern.com.)

 

 

My wonderful family is always so incredibly supportive. I couldn’t do any of it without them!

 

 

It’s true– Amanda went on a *photo* shooting rampage during the event– expect to see some photos of all the Walk-N-Roll team captains as part of the Walk-N-Roll for Spina Bifida publicity campaign!

Other attendees included Shannon Celentano’s family, Dede Mischel. Thank you so much for your support!

When all was said and done, we made $120 for the Walk-N-Roll. Hmmm…I guess that’s my number. Maybe I should play the lottery…?

I feel remarkably blessed to have so many people supporting me. Whether it’s online or off, in person or from afar, there are so many ways that people can impact a life, support a good cause.

So, thanks to each and every one of you who attended and/or promoted either the Twitter party and/or the Bravo! event. I’m amazed and humbled by your love and support.

As if these events weren’t enough to send me into “awareness overload,” a truly remarkable meeting took place on the Saturday following the Bravo event which some of you heard about on Facebook. Yes, I actually met Judy Woodruff of PBS NewsHour for the first time in person, while she was in Orlando covering the campaigns.

 

During our meeting, Judy eagerly agreed to an interview! Below is our chat.

 

And when all is said and done…whether you have given a donation or spread the word, you are helping! Awareness isn’t just a means to an end– it is the end we’re searching for.

 

Love,

Laurita ♥

Summer of Blogs

Why did I decide to title my post “Summer of Blogs”? Well, because it seems that, lately, my entire life is revolving around what I’m doing or what I’m not doing with my blogs!

Earlier this month, I survived a near-disaster with Holdin’ Out for a Hero when, in a desperate attempt to re-design, I deleted WordPress. Smart, huh? Thank God I was able to contact my web host and they were very patient and understanding, and got my site restored.

I’m looking into some upcoming changes for this site, that will hopefully be well-received by my readers! But first, I need to learn a little bit more about how exactly to go about this, so I don’t get my site into trouble again. 😉

Also, by God’s grace, I’m attending the BlogHer ’12 conference next week– in New York City!!! (Can I get a *woot woot*?) And– I leave for NYC tomorrow afternoon! (Can you say, “packing panic attack mode”?)

 

I'm going to Sparkle at BlogHer '12

In spite of all the stress, lack of sleep, and constant worries (health setbacks that I’ve already written about, plus the silly stuff!), I can’t imagine a sweeter time in my life than the present. 

Besides going to BlogHer in NYC, I’ll be extended the trip for a few more days to visit a country I’ve never seen before– Canada!! That’s right, I’m crossing the northern border this time, and, more specifically, I’ll be staying in a city I’ve always dreamed of visiting– Montreal, which is in the French-speaking province of Quebec. (C’est magnifique!) 

Needless to say, I’m super excited about this unexpected twist in my summer plans. 

Another “unexpected twist” I’ll have to deal with when I return is starting physical therapy. I know, I know, I promised you guys I’d get this all squared away soon! But finding a place that’s close to home and is covered by my insurance, etc., is easier said than done. I don’t want to jump into this headfirst (actually, one shouldn’t jump into anything headfirst, unless, of course, you’re Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps!). This is important, and I take it very seriously. So, I need to do a little more research. 

Finally, I’m still reveling in the awesome news that I’ve been invited to take part in a fun,  fabulous new event during BlogHer– a fashion show featuring 18 bloggers as models!! Yep, that’s right. I’ll be strutting my stuff on the runway, not slipping on recently-waxed floors. At least, that is the hope. My goal is to always show people that I don’t have a “disability” (except in the respect that everyone has challenges!), but rather that I have many abilities, among them, my world-renowned sense of style. Okay, maybe not “world-renowned”– still, it’s definitely there! 

If you’re attending the BlogHer ’12 conference this week, I’d love for you to be there, cheering me on, along with my fellow fab models! I haven’t met a single one of them in person, but from our recent online exchanges, I can already tell we’ll end up being friends. 

 So, this is basically what’s left of my summer, in a big, fat nutshell– colossal Web site mishaps, crunch-time, for BlogHer ’12, couture, and Canada. 

All this totally beats dealing with sunburn and sand in my shoes. 

 

 

Love,

Laurita ♥

 

**Disclaimer: This post is sponsored by BRITAX, and I will be compensated for this post.

 

 

 

 

This Week’s Rundown– I Need a Schedule!

Every time it seems I’m about to settle into a routine, something comes along to turn my “schedule” upside down. The truth is, right now, I don’t have a schedule. I have a calendar on which I write down potential opportunities as they present themselves, but I don’t really wake up in the morning knowing exactly what I have programmed for the day.

So, what I really could use is a secretary. Any takers? Yeah. Didn’t think so.

On Saturday, I attended Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer’s 6th Annual Neighborhood & Community Summit at the DoubleTree by Hilton Orlando Hotel. Even though I had to be there by 7:30 a.m., I jumped out of bed with a [partial] smile on my face, because I knew in my heart, it promised to be an exciting day.

During one of the time slots, I went to the “Ask Your Mayor” session. I didn’t hesitate when I asked Mayor Dyer his thoughts on Gov. Rick Scott’s recent cuts to disability programs. He immediately expressed disdain and disgust for the governor’s harmful policies, and stated that he was certain those cuts would jeopardize Florida citizens. At least, there is no doubt in my mind that he is on our team.

I could not leave without making sure that the Mayor and his staff members had my business card. I also made my “elevator pitch” to them, meaning I plugged Holdin’ Out and the spina bifida cause big time. 

With Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer!

With Orlando District 2 Commissioner Tony Ortiz, whom I first met at Relay for Life, and Juan Triana, and Juan Triana, Neighborhood Champion Award nominee.

As some of you might know, right now I am preparing for a trip to Miami (although I won’t say it too loudly!) to attend SheCon. You might recall what happened the last time my family planned a trip to Miami, and for a blogging conference, no less! I’m going to see if I can’t fit a few more necessities into my luggage, namely: a four-leaf clover, a rabbit’s foot, and a Rosary. (Probably not kidding about the Rosary!)

During the Mayor’s summit, I made a new friend, and she told me about an upcoming blogger event I hadn’t heard of– and which is very close to home! So, now it seems I’ll also be attending the Central Florida Blogger Conference in Maitland. I’m so excited about this one-day, no-travel-required, very-affordable event, which will hopefully be one more venue where I can promote the spina bifida cause.

And now I want to tell you briefly about a wake-up call I received. I got a phone call today from a young woman who was referred to me through a mutual contact, and whose daughter has spina bifida and is in those trying young adult years I’ve written about before. We were on the phone for over an hour! It seemed that, in talking to me, this mom was able to get a first-hand perspective of what those years are like, socially, emotionally, and in other ways. Before we ended our conversation, she thanked me over and over, and blessed me, for listening and talking to her.

So, I want to leave you all with this thought: I started off by saying I needed a “schedule,” but today’s phone call and the heartfelt exchange that followed showed me that God had other plans for me. Instead of just handing over my business card at an event for professionals and speaking to the bigwigs, I comforted a distressed mother. It’s easy to forget your true purpose when you’re busy chowing on chicken and risotto at a Hilton, but I’m glad this young woman reminded me that I live to serve, and not to be served.

Love,

Laurita ♥

P.S. I really missed being able to put a “heart” at the end of my sign-off. Thank you, WordPress!