To Tanzania with Love | The Laurita Spina Bifida Project wants to donate wheelchairs

“How sad it is that we give up on people who are just like us.” — Fred Rogers (“Mr. Rogers”)

I don’t really remember what it’s like not being able to walk. As parental anecdotes recall, I was about two years old when I took my first steps. My parents were overjoyed, of course, but probably more than most parents, because I have spina bifida. According to my doctors at the time, I wasn’t supposed to be able to walk.

I may not remember what it was like crawling around the house or not being able to stand up, but, at age 30 now, I am beginning to grasp what it means to have limited mobility. My knees and back hurt constantly, and my wheelchair is getting much more mileage than it used to.

As I recently learned through a good friend I’ve never met, there are people in Tanzania, and in many other countries, who do not know the privilege of owning a wheelchair— what a blessing it is to have the equipment to facilitate mobility.

Little did I know until these past few weeks, that there are people on the other side of the world who would give anything to have the freedom I am often complaining about— the freedom to move.

That’s why my non-profit organization, The Laurita Spina Bifida Project, has offered to help the Association for Spina Bifida And Hydrocephalus Tanzania (ASBAHT) by raising funds so they can purchase wheelchairs, walkers, crutches, and a prosthetic leg for a young girl with spina bifida.

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Image courtesy Sifa Sylvia, ASBAHT 

A shifting perspective

It really gives me pause to reflect on how grateful I am for my “inconveniences.”

Over there, where my friend lives, people aren’t griping because someone took the accessible parking space. Or because their wheelchair won’t fit in their friend’s car when she offers to give me a ride.

They don’t complain about these problems because they don’t exist. Because access to the mobility devices they need doesn’t exist.

Many moms of children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus must push their children in strollers instead of carrying them. If they don’t have access to the brain surgery to have a shunt placed, the children’s heads grow until the parents can no longer carry them. Even these strollers are very hard to come by. As for me, I am only vaguely reminded I have a shunt in my head when the weather changes and I feel a slight headache.

This holiday season, I am fully committed to making the freedom of mobility a reality and not just a dream for at least several people in the Tanzanian spina bifida community…people who are much like me.

Maybe this will make a huge, life-altering difference for them. Maybe it won’t. All I know is, everyone needs someone in their life who refuses to give up on them.

I have you guys. Now, it’s my turn to be that person for somebody else.

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Image courtesy Sifa Sylvia, ASBAHT 

How you can help

What we need, first and foremost, is monetary donations. Whether it’s $5 or $500, every dollar makes a big impact when you add it all up. Trust me on this! How incredible is it that for the price of a latte macchiato you bring us one step closer to giving a deserving human being the gift of mobility?

 

Here’s a rough estimate of what each item costs, in U.S. dollars:

• Wheelchairs – $140.00 each

  • Walkers – $70.00 each

• A prosthetic leg for a youth with spina bifida – $460.00

Other ways to help out

If you own a company or know of a company or organization that might be interested in partnering with us to help raise the funds, please reach out to me at laurita.tellado@gmail.com. I truly believe “it takes a village,” and you are all my shining example of that!

Consider this campaign for your company’s end-of-year charitable contributions. Every donation is tax-deductible.

Also, since there are just so many wonderful social good campaigns during this time of the year, we need your help with getting the word out. Please, post to Facebook, Tweet, share, blog, Pin, Instagram post, etc.! There is truly no action that is too small to make a difference.

Please share / post using the hashtags #TheLSBProject , #SpinaBifida, and #Give5ToThrive (because we want to encourage that no amount is too small!).

Keep up with this campaign by following and connecting with us on social media:

The Laurita Spina Bifida Project on Facebook

@TheLSBProject on Twitter 

@TheLSBProject on Instagram

Remember what it’s all about

Finally, keep in your mind and heart that we are doing this to pay it forward. We have been so Blessed throughout this entire process, and I’m grateful for each and every person who has been part of The Laurita Spina Bifida Project’s journey thus far.

In the words of my friend Sifa of Tanzania, the angel behind-the-scenes who has put me in contact with the ASBAHT: “It will be an honor for ASBAHT to partner with you or any other organization or individuals out there with the heart to help the forgotten children, youth, and adults living with SBH in Tanzania.”

Thank you, Sifa. We’ll do our best.

Love,

Laurita ♥

In Case You Are Jealous of My Friday Night

People often comment on my Facebook posts (especially fellow ladies!) saying what a fabulous life I have. They see me gliding from event to event, effortlessly, cozying up to public figures and instagramming delicious food (and coffee drinks)!

I don’t blame you all for commenting, or even feeling a twinge of jealousy or resentment. It’s natural, and to be completely honest, the same thing goes through my mind when I’m instagram- or Facebook-stalking my friends and colleagues.

But, do you want the brutally honest truth? Because here it is.

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There’s A LOT that gets filtered out of my life when I post on social media. Like, a hell of a lot. When I publish a photo of me in a gorgeous dress with my hair and makeup flawlessly done at an event enjoying the company of others, here’s what you don’t see:

You don’t see/hear the laughably-inevitable meltdown/pity-party two hours earlier about not being able to wear the shoes all my other girl peers are wearing (heels, stilettos, etc.).

You don’t see the panic attack I’m having as I’m rushing to make it out the door on time and have to stop and raid every drawer in the house for urinary catheters. Since they are delivered and I need a doctor’s prescription, it’s not like I can waltz into a public restroom with a few quarters and get a catheter out of a dispenser. (But you can easily find tampons or condoms, no doubt!)

You don’t see the frustration I feel when trying to find the perfect purse to match my outfit— that is, one that is sleek enough to carry easily but that will fit at least 5 catheters (because when your LIFE depends on using a plastic tube every three hours, there’s no room for guesstimating. Better to overestimate than…God forbid. And if I have an infection…forget it.)

You don’t see me up all night with indigestion because my digestive tract is much slower than everyone else’s. That expensive dinner I had cost me a good night’s sleep.

But most of all, you don’t see the struggle it is as I try my best to “fit in” (say what you will about being an individual, but don’t kid yourself— EVERYONE wants to fit in) while treading the delicate balance of staying “healthy” (whatever that means, because I haven’t felt “healthy” in many years) and being able to breathe easy and have some semblance of a social life.

That all being said, I know how truly fortunate I am. I have opportunities that many of my peers with spina bifida do not. I don’t lose sight of that.

But, today is Friday. Tonight, God willing, I actually am going out on a Friday night alone (a rare occurrence!) to attend a social / professional function. Just a while ago, I got off the phone after talking to my medical supply provider and my urologist’s office back-to-back. It feels like I am constantly having to negotiate how important a life-saving product is to me. Negotiate how many times a day I am allowed to pee. Can you imagine having your visits to the bathroom regulated? These are questions I actually get from my doctor’s office. (They will actually insist I drink more water, and then ask me why I use so many catheters!)

Not to mention my private medical insurance, which makes me jump through bureaucratic hoops just to be able to receive these bare necessities.

I don’t want to be calculating. I don’t want to be counting catheters. I don’t want to leave half of my meal untouched because I’m afraid of indigestion. I don’t want to walk into the place and immediately scan where the bathrooms are. I don’t want to wonder where I’ll park my wheelchair.

Tonight, I just want to act my age, and know that I’ve earned it. Tonight, I don’t just want to LIVE, I want to feel ALIVE, and know that my posts on social media actually reflect the fabulous reality.

To the Woman who Aborted Her Baby with Spina Bifida

 

Dear Woman,

First off, let me say that I am not writing this on an impulse. In fact, I have given this a lot of thought and have decided to give this situation a “grace period” in which I could cool off, reflect, cry, pray, gain perspective from others in your situation, and allow myself enough time in which to answer you without anger or bitterness.

Of course, this time has allowed me to be more merciful and fair to you. But please know that I needed this time as much as you did. It’s not easy to for me to process my emotions about an issue that is so personal to me.

But, you E-mailed me asking for advice and answers. After choosing to terminate your pregnancy of a child with spina bifida, you want my advice, my insight, my wisdom, on how to have a “healthy” baby.

How’s this?

I have nothing to offer you. No advice, no answers, no wisdom, no tips, no magic crystal ball to predict what your next child will be like. 

My first instinct, upon reading your E-mail to me, was to hate you. After all, you managed to break down wall after wall of cautious, precarious illusion of self-esteem that I have spent 28 years painstakingly building. And for 28 years, it has worked for me.

 

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My Mami when she was about eight months pregnant with me. I am my parents’ only child.

 

When I first began blogging five years ago, I was moved by the many moms who contacted me. Most have had children with spina bifida, and some were pregnant with a baby with spina bifida, and wanted advice on how to handle the birth of a child with “special needs.” Or maybe they wanted solidarity; just the notion of knowing someone else out there in cyberspace can relate. I was elated at the idea of being able to help these women; give them a glimmer of hope for what the future held for their children. I offered them my friendship and unconditional support, and in return, I have been rewarded many times over by their reciprocity, their encouragement in my difficult times, and their genuine happiness at my triumphs.

Then I opened your E-mail. It’s as if five years’ worth of fortresses of support and encouragement from these moms and little white lies I told myself quickly eroded around me. I was exposed. Vulnerable. You shattered my illusion of invincibility.

I built a community of support and encouragement, of sharing knowledge along with the good, the bad, and the ugly about spina bifida. Women all over the world contact me to thank me for simply sharing my story, trivial as it may seem to many. Because the story of my normal yet fulfilling life gives them hope. It helps them to know their children can aspire to this.

And yet, I cannot help you, because you aborted your baby. You cut the common thread we would have shared. Now all I see is a large, dark chasm between us, because I am nothing like you. 

No, I am that child with spina bifida, the one you chose to abort. I look in the mirror, and I see the life that was discarded because it wasn’t deemed worthy of living.

And you ask me for advice because you don’t want your next baby to turn out like me.

And I am angry beyond words. Because in spite of all I have accomplished in my life, no one wants to have a child like me.

Not even my own mother would have wanted that. But she did.

 

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I was about 18 months old in this picture. Whether or not Mami envisioned having a baby with spina bifida, she and I have always been thick as thieves.

 

And that, plain and simple, is what frightens me the most. That maybe, just maybe, your story and my mother’s are not all that different. You each won the lottery that no one wants to win.

I wish you well…and maybe next time, take a second glance at your lottery ticket.

It’s Never Too Early #RSVawareness #PreemieProtection

 

This is part of a sponsored collaboration with MedImmune and Latina Mom Bloggers. However, all opinions expressed are my own. 

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As many of you know, one of my greatest passions in life is raising public awareness of spina bifida and the challenges that affect people living with SB, as well as the accomplishments, talents, and abilities of these very people.

Along the way, I have become aware of so many other worthy causes, in particular other serious conditions and illnesses that also deserve awareness and publicity. It is in sharing information about these causes that I find great purpose.

November 17th is World Prematurity Day. (It’s actually the day after my birthday!)

With many wonderful awareness initiatives, walks, and fundraisers that now take place nationally, it’s awesome to see that much of the public is now more informed about the incidence of premature births.

What many don’t know about, however, is a disease that affects many premature babies– respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV.

It was the lack of awareness of spina bifida that encouraged me to begin writing this blog in the first place. And now, it’s the lack of awareness of RSV among parents that has compelled me to partner with MedImmune to share this vital, potentially life-saving, information. 

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RSV is a very common seasonal virus that affects nearly 100% of babies by the age of 2. 

Here are some fast facts about RSV and prematurity that  every parent needs to know: 

  • Each year worldwide, 13 million babies are born prematurely
  • 75% of parents don’t know the definition of prematurity (birth at or before 37 weeks gestation)
  •  Most pregnant women don’t ask their healthcare provider about the risk of delivering prematurely and the potential consequences of preterm birth for their child
  • Severe RSV disease is the leading cause of infant hospitalizations in the U.S., with approximately 125,000 hospitalizations and up to 200 infant deaths each year.
  • RSV season usually occurs from November through March for most of the U.S., but it varies regionally, and from year to year.

 

Most of the moms I’ve befriended or who befriend me on social media have a child with spina bifida. As pillars of strength and examples of grace and perseverance for their families, these women would do anything for their families, and it would break my heart to hear of one of their children falling ill with RSV, especially with everything else they already have to deal with because of spina bifida. 

This is why I feel it’s so important for me to share the symptoms and warning signs to look out for when diagnosing RSV. Parents, please be on high alert if your child exhibits any of these symptoms: 

  • Persistent coughing or wheezing
  • Bluish color around the lips, mouth, or fingernails
  •  Rapid, difficult, or gasping breaths
  • Fever (especially if it is over 100.4°F [rectal] in infants under 3 months of age)

There is no specific treatment for RSV disease, so prevention is your best bet. That being said, here are a few simple parents should take to help reduce the risk of your child getting RSV, particularly during high season, which is from November through March:

 

  • Understand the risk factors and ask your child’s pediatrician if your child may be at increased risk
  • Wash your hands and ask others to do the same
  • Keep toys, clothes, blankets, and sheets clean
  • Avoid crowds and other young children during RSV season

 

Yes, this information may seem very overwhelming, and I’m sure that it’s nothing that parents want to even think about. But, as the tired old saying goes, “it’s better to be safe than sorry,” and by taking the proper precautions, parents, especially those whose children have other health issues, will have one less thing to worry about. 

And it’s never too early– or premature— to take good care of our children!

For more information and tips, you can visit www.RSVprotection.com.

 

Join Me in Getting Covered #TakeCareChat

Disclosure: This post is part of a campaign with Ad Council and Get Covered America. I will be compensated for publishing this post and for participating in the Twitter chat. All ideas and opinions are my own. 

 

If there’s someone who truly understands the value of having good health insurance, it’s me– trust me. I certainly wouldn’t be here without the vigilant care of many good healthcare providers and nurses, and there were times in my childhood when I was literally in and out of the hospital every other week.

Sadly, more than 1 in 6 Americans don’t have health insurance.

This is mostly due to one of the following reasons:

  • They don’t receive coverage from their employer 
  • They cannot afford coverage
  • They were previously denied coverage because of a pre-existing condition

 

Under the new Affordable Care Act, people cannot be denied health coverage because of a preexisting condition.  This is fabulous news for me, having spina bifida and hydrocephalus! Thanks to the ACA, insurance companies can’t turn me away because of that. 

I feel very blessed and fortunate to have access to good healthcare, and I don’t wish to take that for granted for a single second. But, if you’re not willing to take my word for it, perhaps you’ll listen to this adorable menagerie of pets who have a message for you:

 

 

What’s more, most people will have to pay a fine if you don’t enroll in healthcare up by March 31st. The 2014 fine is $95 for an adult or 1% of a person’s income, whichever is greater. (The fine is $47.50 for a child, and a family can only be fined up to $285.)

I’ll be joining Ad Council and Get Covered America TOMORROW from 1 to 2 p.m. E.T. during a Twitter chat where you can learn more and ask questions about getting covered. Be sure to follow @GetCoveredUS on Twitter and Tweet using the hashtag #TakeCareChat to participate in the conversation!

 

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In the meantime, you can visit GetCoveredAmerica.org to find out how you can enroll in health insurance, and to get answers to some frequently asked questions about the process. There are also some pretty awesome tools on the site, like the Get Covered Calculator, which can help you discover how much assistance you could qualify for to help pay for your insurance coverage.

Figuring out how to navigate the ins and outs of the ACA can be daunting, especially since it’s so crucial to your health and to the health of your family. But with the proper tools and resources, you’ll be enrolling in no time– and hopefully by the deadline of March 31st!

 

–Laurita

My Sin of Omission

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Yeah, it’s been a while, to say the least.

I spent the last few hours posting photos, status updates, and responding to Tweets about an event I attended in Orlando, and which I plan to write about on my other blog.

Earlier tonight, I put on my casual-dress-professional-cold-weather attire and was present at an exclusive preview tasting at a chocolatier.

I sipped great wine, ate fine chocolate, and mingled with friends, old and new.

We exchanged lighthearted conversation about our blogs, and weighed in on other recent events many of us have attended.

I exchanged hugs, social kisses, and sincere thanks to the people who hosted and invited me.

And I did it all with the utmost sincerity. Of that, you can be sure. 

No one knew that, for about a week, I’ve been dealing with a persistent, painful bladder infection that has me cringing every time I pee (a.k.a. “self-cath,” but whatevs. Peeing is peeing.).

No one probably imagined that, every night for the past three nights, severe bladder cramps have kept me up late and have almost brought me to tears. (Well, not really close to tears– but only because I have a pretty high threshold for pain. I’ve grown “accustomed” to it, if that’s even possible.) 

No one could have known that, just this afternoon, I was on the phone several times with my urologist’s nurse, scheduling what will be my first appointment in years with him. I’ve been in a urology limbo of sorts, because he is a pediatric urologist, and while technically, he is supposed to see patients until they turn 21, I am a “special case,” because I have spina bifida and an augmented bladder. He performed my bladder augmentation surgery– my most invasive and dangerous procedure to date– when I was 10, and I trust him with my life. 

Indeed, no one, save for my parents, would have known any of this, because, simply put, I haven’t talked about it. 

And why would I talk about it?

Since the holidays, I’ve been to numerous blogger events, celebrated birthdays, weekday happy hours, workshops, and the like.

My posts on Facebook have often been the trigger for playful, harmless jealousy. Friends often comment, wishing they had my life. From what I usually post on my Facebook profile, I can’t say that I blame them. By all accounts, I seem to lead a pretty fabulous life. 

I’ve got news for you, though.

Everyone omits on Facebook. 

Yep, that’s right. From the bitchiest posts to the statuses that are downright inspiring, we are all guilty of carefully vetting and considering the content that we post on our social media profiles. 

Why would anyone assume I am an exception? 

In fact, if anyone has good reason to filter her output, it’s me. 

Because my girlfriends don’t want to hear during our ladies’ night out about how my urine stinks of ammonia and looks as murky as swamp water.

Because, as bloggers, while we all over-share to an extent, no one wants to hear at a professional gathering of social media influencers how Miralax isn’t doing the trick for me just yet.

Because, God forbid I should choose the joyful family Christmas dinner in Puerto Rico as the venue for disclosing how I’ve totally slacked off on my neurosurgery stuff and am now desperate to schedule a follow-up with my neuro to find out the results of my MRI, which I had done before the holidays.

Because God forbid I be more human than people can actually bear. 

Unsurprisingly, the issues I just described above (and many more) are very common topics of discussion on many of the private online groups and forums I’m a part of that pertain to life with spina bifida.

You might find it odd, but I actually don’t share too much in these groups. Don’t get me wrong– I’m eternally grateful for the love and support many of these people show me and others with spina bifida. I’ve forged many great friendships with parents of children with SB, and with adults with SB, all over the world.

I guess that I don’t feel the need to share everything about the spina bifida part of my life with them. Heck, they majored in this, as did I!

But I want to share it with you. 

And I want to be able to share honestly and openly with you– without any of the following responses that I’m dreading right now, and that I always dread:

1. Pity. Please, absolutely NO “I’m sorry you have spina bifida” talk. It makes me feel as if you believe that living with spina bifida is pitiful and shameful. And trust me– I don’t need that. 

2. Discomfort, awkwardness, squeamishness. I’m sorry if I slip up during lunch and casually mention I have to go cath. Usually I say “pee,” but occasionally I will slip up and make some allusion to the fact that I use a plastic tube to urinate. Obviously, I overlooked the fact that you are not as used to this as I am, and any remark that you make along the lines of “ew” and the like will only make you come across as a jerk. Please, grow up and get over yourself. Call me when your pee is prettier than mine.

3. Holy talk. You know what I mean here. I consider myself to be a religious/spiritual person with my own faith and personal relationship with the Creator. And if you say you’ll pray for me, I’ll gladly accept your prayers, good vibes, etc. But please don’t attempt to make yourself feel better about my ailment by saying that “everything happens for a reason.” It’ll upset me, and will only serve to make me wonder why this “everything” doesn’t seem to be happening to you. 

Simply put– I don’t expect everyone in my life to relate to my struggles, anymore than you might expect me to relate to all of yours. If you can’t relate to the situation, that’s perfectly fine. I think admitting you can’t understand what it’s like, is actually the first step towards putting yourself in another person’s shoes.

The ugly truth about life is that permanent chronic conditions like spina bifida can’t be cured, anymore than you can bring your deceased loved one back from the dead or force the cast of F•R•I•E•N•D•S to do a reunion.

It’s just not going to happen like that.

We all go through difficult, challenging, brutal stuff. So from here on out, I promise to try to level with you. I’ll try to be honest.

Are you willing to try to listen?

 

“Don’t walk behind me; I may not lead. Don’t walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.”   –Albert Camus 

 

I’ll Show You My Reasons

 

Author’s Note: This post was written in October 2013. Over a year later, I still feel this way. Thank God Nicholas made a full recovery from his injuries described below. But his and my family– as well as so many other families– continue to wait for hope. We wait for awareness. 

 

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October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month. We’ve just made it past the half-way mark, and already I’m feeling like a broken record. 

I’m angry. I’m sad. I’m frustrated. I feel helpless. And all because it’s October. 

October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month. 

It’s also Everything Else Month. 

I’m not angry at the other causes– breast cancer, down syndrome, domestic violence– how could I be? They are valid, serious causes, every bit as worthy and deserving as spina bifida of being recognized and honored and supported, not just in October, but every month. 

I’m angry because the excuse that many people give to not support the Spina Bifida Cause is because they are busy supporting these other causes. 

I’m angry because they don’t get it

I’m angry because they believe spina bifida is less serious. Less worthy. Less important. 

On Monday, I visited Nicholas in the hospital. Nicholas is an eight-year-old boy with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. 

Last week, he was the victim of an unexpected, traumatic and heartbreaking incident when he was attacked in a park. While I won’t go into the details here, because it’s a situation that has caused his family– and all of their friends and loved ones– so much pain, suffice it to say he suffered two concussions and began having frequent seizures. 

These seizures could be enough to cause him irreversible brain damage. He already has developmental and speech delays because of the many neurosurgeries he’s had. 

How is Nicholas doing now? Thank God, he’s out of the hospital, as of last night. I’ve been in frequent contact with his mom, Cheryl, who is my very dear friend and who slept at his side every night in the hospital. According to her, his seizures are now under control, but only time will tell if he will get back all of his cognitive functions.

He’s not himself right now, she told me. Indeed, when I went to see him on Monday, the usually cheerful, calm eight-year-old was impatient– he even walked right out of the hospital room at one point, determined to visit the playroom. When he didn’t get his way, he growled and screamed unintelligibly, clearly frustrated.

Cheryl noted that he never behaves this way. She misses her sweet little Angel. 

There was one moment that stood out in a positive way for all of us, when a young hospital volunteer stopped by to perform magic tricks.

Nicholas lit up. His mother, and all of us that were in the room with them, watched in amazement as Nicholas even verbalized what he was feeling. He wanted to know “how he did that” when he demonstrated a trick. He walked right over to the young man and did not take his eyes off him the entire time. 

Watching him was, indeed, magic. 

Of course, many causes will demand your attention– this month, and every month. All of these are important, and we should take the time to learn as much as we can to help those we love– and ourselves– prevent illnesses and other devastating circumstances.

But, to a child living with spina bifida– and to the family that cares for him or her– often, there is no frame of reference outside of spina bifida. Sometimes, there is no escaping the uncertainty and pain that comes from knowing that someone you love is suffering. 

There are plenty of moments, like the one we witnessed with Nicholas, when you get a glimpse of hope, of recovery, of that return to the simple joys of childhood as it should be.

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Happier times. Celebrating my birthday 2 years ago with Nicholas and his family– dad Jerran, mom Cheryl, and big brother Daniel.

But spina bifida complicates things. They can turn even the most common illnesses and injuries into a nightmare. Sometimes, we lose hope. 

During those moments, we try to choose to hold on to the moments we’ve enjoyed– the moments that make us laugh out loud, even through tears. The trivial moments. Sometimes one trivial moment can matter more than 1,000 serious moments.

But, my anger remains unassuaged. People still dare to question why this matters to me. 

I can only think of one good reason: 

Because I’ve been there, too. 

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Just days after I was born. The battle to survive and thrive with spina bifida begins almost immediately after birth for most of us.

 

BlogHer was very gracious in allowing me to share my story with their many followers! Please read, comment, share my post, and let BlogHer know that we need more stories about spina bifida awareness. 

Love,

Laurita

The Best Family Heirlooms: ALLERGYFACE™

This post is part of a sponsored campaign on behalf of Latina Bloggers Connect and the makers of ZYRTEC®.

 

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Let’s face it. Perhaps one of the worst things that can happen to our daily beauty routine is allergies. They give us runny, red noses, puffy, watery eyes and face, and general low self-esteem.

But many of these allergy annoyances are no match for anyone with a good makeup kit! Blogger Carmen Ordoñez of Viva Fashion has a personal motto: “You can look great without breaking the bank.” 

And this applies to all of us who occasionally suffer from ALLERGYFACE™.

I come from a long, proud line of allergy sufferers. My allergy lineage can be traced back three generations!

My Abuelita has always been prone to severe allergies– of every kind. Even a simple activity such as going out in the yard to garden, which she loves, could trigger a reaction that would render her looking like a cooked lobster.

My Mami and I are also sensitive to the sun, though not quite as badly as poor Abuelita. This is why Mami always recommends using sunblock before going out and catching some rays.

Other products my Mami and I both can’t live without are makeup for sensitive skin (concealer, foundation, blush, eyeshadow, etc.)

Also, it’s important to remember to remove makeup completely before going to bed. Even the slightest bit of eyeshadow or eyeliner residue can be enough to trigger itchy, watery, red eyes.

Carmen Ordoñez also features some more great tips for combating ALLERGYFACE™ in her second YouTube installment, “Generations of Beauty Advice.” (Watch it here!) 

Also, while beauty tips are fabulous, it’s critical not to forget about the health aspect of this.  If you know you are prone to allergies, you should do everything you can to prevent the onset of an episode. Just in case, it wouldn’t hurt to carry antihistamine. (I even carry an epinephrine injection in my purse! It’s better to be safe than sorry.)


Some beauty tips can be more valuable than the most expensive heirlooms. What advice has been passed down in your family that can help fight ALLERGYFACE™? 

Can Beauty Sense Trump Genetics? ALLERGYFACE™

This post is part of a sponsored campaign on behalf of Latina Bloggers Connect and the makers of ZYRTEC®.

 
People say you can’t escape your heredity, your genetic fate.

 

Years ago, my parents told me the story of a conversation they had while they were still dating. Both Mami and Papi were prone to severe allergies, and their relationship was already heading towards marriage.

 

“You know,” said Papi, “When we have a child, he or she is going to be extremely allergic.”

 

“That’s true,” Mami said, in response to his observation. “Pobrecito.”

Ever since I can remember, I’ve been plagued by my genes– both a product and a victim of a genetic predisposition to allergies. Both my parents are prone to both seasonal– and year-round– allergies, as is my grandmother. Indeed, noses “run” in our family!

When I was about five years old, I was tested to find out just how prone I might be to developing allergies. While I don’t know all the specifics, I remember my parents telling me that a score of 100 was considered “normal,” and anything above 100 wasn’t. 
 
I scored above 800. Holy moly. Indeed, my heredity had totally betrayed me.

While there is little I can do to prevent being allergic to certain things– like shellfish, or the pollen of many different trees– there’s a lot I can do to prevent allergies interfering with my life. Almost every day, especially during the spring allergy season, I take an antihistamine like Zyrtec to help alleviate some of the symptoms like sneezing and itchy, watery eyes.

But when it comes to disguising those annoying symptoms, I hardly know what to do. This is why I’m so excited to participate in Zyrtec’s ALLERGYFACE™ campaign, which has taught me a few tricks of the make-up trade to help conceal when allergies are getting the best of me.

 

Allergy-Face-Logo-Vector-File-e1363196478621

 

A few musts for me on an allergy-prone day are: using eyedrops, avoiding any strong perfumes, and avoiding the use of eyeliner, as it tends to bother me when my eyes get itchy.

 

Fortunately, Zyrtec has partnered with beauty and fashion expert Carmen Ordoñez of Viva Fashion blog to bring us all some great tips for disguising that dreaded ALLERGYFACE™. This will be a three-part series on YouTube.com/Zyrtec featuring the best tips for disguising your allergy symptoms.

 

Watch the video below as she takes us through some ideas to hide puffy face, watery eyes, and a red nose.

Stay tuned for the release of parts two and three of Carmen’s video series, to be distributed in the summer and fall, respectively. 

A big thanks to Zyrtec and Carmen Ordoñez (@VivaFashion) for giving us the tools and know-how to put our best face forward– even when we’re not feeling our best! Take that, ALLERGYFACE™!

 

At least that’s one victory for me in the battle against my genes! 😉

 

What’s your story about how allergies have affected your life? Do you have any tips for combating ALLERGYFACE™? Don’t forget to Tweet using the #ALLERGYFACE and #ZYRTEC hashtags on Twitter, and “like” ZYRTEC on Facebook to join the conversation.

 

–Laurita :)

 

A Different Campaign Continues

Yes, I know there are other things going on today. Namely, one big thing— the most historic presidential election in U.S. history. Don’t think I’ve forgetten; I’ve already voted! 😉

But after weeks of being bombarded on both my Facebook and Twitter feeds with political post after political (or apolitical) post, I wanted to take a breather and reflect on the awesomeness that was October.

The beginning of November marked the end of Spina Bifida Awareness Month for this year. To say it was a smashing success would be the understatement of the century– we killed it! 

But the campaign isn’t over. Yes, the Walk-N-Roll donation link is still active. Please share, and donate away!

There are so many issues at stake besides prevention– quality of life for children and adults alike, educating Ob/Gyns about the facts on spina bifida so they can give impartial but encouraging information to expectant parents, and not to mention those with spina bifida all over the world, many who might not be as fortunate as we are to have such a strong community.

I know I’ve thanked you over the past few weeks for all your support– but there are a few people and organizations that I would like to reiterate my thanks to.

First, I need to thank Bravo! Cucina Italiana for their support and for providing the location for my local fundraiser for the Walk-N-Roll for Spina Bifida. We raised $120 that night, and we also raised awareness!

Also, I want to take the time in this post to personally thank each and every one of the sponsors, bloggers, and supporters of the very first Walk-N-Roll for Spina Bifida Twitter Party I co-hosted on October 17th.

 

Chantilly Patiño was the driving force that organized, planned, coordinated and then hosted the Twitter chat. She also sought out sponsors, got us donations for prizes raffled during the Twitter party, and wrote up the script and designed the promotional graphics. Have I said THANK YOU? Not enough!! Chantilly has indeed become a wonderful friend, fellow advocate, and key supporter of my spina bifida campaign.

Chantilly also took it upon herself to help me moderate the Spina Bifida Advocacy Network, which we officially launched during the Twitter party. Currently, our group boasts nearly 500 members and growing!

When all was said and done, our jaws dropped collectively when the Twitter party report revealed we had nearly 2 million impressions! A truly miraculous, magical night for the Spina Bifida cause.

Now, it’s time to really recognize all the sponsors/organizations that made it happen. I encourage you all to visit their Web sites and support them in whatever way you can!

 

 

Whether they blogged about the awareness campaign, donated a prize for the Twitter party, co-hosted the party with us, or simply sent us good vibes, all of these sponsors now deserve to be showered with love!

A very special thanks goes out to Latino Rebels for immediately following up the Twitter conversation with a TweetReach report showing that social media can make a difference for a great cause!

 

 

I could never thank them enough for taking that extra step to ensure everyone understands the significance of that night!

 

So yes…a very special election is taking place today in the U.S. I’ve already voted, and I hope you get out to vote, too! But as far as my preferences and values are concerned…my vote goes out to the Spina Bifida cause. I believe in it, and I hope you’ve come to believe in it as strongly as I do.

Yes, October is over. But now the real work begins– which is to keep spina bifida in the public eye, and in the minds and hearts of everyone.

 

Love,

Laurita ♥