To Tanzania with Love | The Laurita Spina Bifida Project wants to donate wheelchairs

“How sad it is that we give up on people who are just like us.” — Fred Rogers (“Mr. Rogers”)

I don’t really remember what it’s like not being able to walk. As parental anecdotes recall, I was about two years old when I took my first steps. My parents were overjoyed, of course, but probably more than most parents, because I have spina bifida. According to my doctors at the time, I wasn’t supposed to be able to walk.

I may not remember what it was like crawling around the house or not being able to stand up, but, at age 30 now, I am beginning to grasp what it means to have limited mobility. My knees and back hurt constantly, and my wheelchair is getting much more mileage than it used to.

As I recently learned through a good friend I’ve never met, there are people in Tanzania, and in many other countries, who do not know the privilege of owning a wheelchair— what a blessing it is to have the equipment to facilitate mobility.

Little did I know until these past few weeks, that there are people on the other side of the world who would give anything to have the freedom I am often complaining about— the freedom to move.

That’s why my non-profit organization, The Laurita Spina Bifida Project, has offered to help the Association for Spina Bifida And Hydrocephalus Tanzania (ASBAHT) by raising funds so they can purchase wheelchairs, walkers, crutches, and a prosthetic leg for a young girl with spina bifida.

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Image courtesy Sifa Sylvia, ASBAHT 

A shifting perspective

It really gives me pause to reflect on how grateful I am for my “inconveniences.”

Over there, where my friend lives, people aren’t griping because someone took the accessible parking space. Or because their wheelchair won’t fit in their friend’s car when she offers to give me a ride.

They don’t complain about these problems because they don’t exist. Because access to the mobility devices they need doesn’t exist.

Many moms of children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus must push their children in strollers instead of carrying them. If they don’t have access to the brain surgery to have a shunt placed, the children’s heads grow until the parents can no longer carry them. Even these strollers are very hard to come by. As for me, I am only vaguely reminded I have a shunt in my head when the weather changes and I feel a slight headache.

This holiday season, I am fully committed to making the freedom of mobility a reality and not just a dream for at least several people in the Tanzanian spina bifida community…people who are much like me.

Maybe this will make a huge, life-altering difference for them. Maybe it won’t. All I know is, everyone needs someone in their life who refuses to give up on them.

I have you guys. Now, it’s my turn to be that person for somebody else.

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Image courtesy Sifa Sylvia, ASBAHT 

How you can help

What we need, first and foremost, is monetary donations. Whether it’s $5 or $500, every dollar makes a big impact when you add it all up. Trust me on this! How incredible is it that for the price of a latte macchiato you bring us one step closer to giving a deserving human being the gift of mobility?

 

Here’s a rough estimate of what each item costs, in U.S. dollars:

• Wheelchairs – $140.00 each

  • Walkers – $70.00 each

• A prosthetic leg for a youth with spina bifida – $460.00

Other ways to help out

If you own a company or know of a company or organization that might be interested in partnering with us to help raise the funds, please reach out to me at laurita.tellado@gmail.com. I truly believe “it takes a village,” and you are all my shining example of that!

Consider this campaign for your company’s end-of-year charitable contributions. Every donation is tax-deductible.

Also, since there are just so many wonderful social good campaigns during this time of the year, we need your help with getting the word out. Please, post to Facebook, Tweet, share, blog, Pin, Instagram post, etc.! There is truly no action that is too small to make a difference.

Please share / post using the hashtags #TheLSBProject , #SpinaBifida, and #Give5ToThrive (because we want to encourage that no amount is too small!).

Keep up with this campaign by following and connecting with us on social media:

The Laurita Spina Bifida Project on Facebook

@TheLSBProject on Twitter 

@TheLSBProject on Instagram

Remember what it’s all about

Finally, keep in your mind and heart that we are doing this to pay it forward. We have been so Blessed throughout this entire process, and I’m grateful for each and every person who has been part of The Laurita Spina Bifida Project’s journey thus far.

In the words of my friend Sifa of Tanzania, the angel behind-the-scenes who has put me in contact with the ASBAHT: “It will be an honor for ASBAHT to partner with you or any other organization or individuals out there with the heart to help the forgotten children, youth, and adults living with SBH in Tanzania.”

Thank you, Sifa. We’ll do our best.

Love,

Laurita ♥

Top 5 Moments & Lessons at Top Blogueras Retreat 2013: UNited & UNdefeated

 

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Above photo courtesy of Myrna Calderón.

 

 

I’m not going to lie to you. (You should know that by now!) The past few weeks for me have involved stress, tears, joy, excitement, more tears, and fears of developing a hernia. That’s usually what happens when I get sandwiched between conferences.

But I did it. I managed to attend the LATISM ’13 conference exactly a week after experiencing my first Hispana Leadership Summit in Orlando– and I also was honored to be invited to attend the second annual LATISM Top Blogueras Retreat in-between!

When it comes to attending conferences, my philosophy has evolved over time. I used to engage in the practice of grabbing an agenda first-thing, then circling and highlighting all of the sessions I wanted to attend.

I have long since abandoned that practice, because the idea of planning ahead for anything just seems ludicrous to me now. There’s the plan, and then there’s reality. 

The reality, I’ve learned, is the far better plan! 

Such was the recurring theme of my five nights in New York City. So, without further ado, I’m sharing some experiences and lessons I acquired during the first part of my adventure, The Top Blogueras Retreat and visit to the United Nations.

 

 

1. Eating out in New York with 100 of your hermanas is, in fact, material for a sit-com. 

During our first night together after all the Top Blogueras arrived, we headed over to Havana Central in Times Square– I think. Because I don’t think any of us knew for sure where we were going, LOL! We had to take taxis in very small groups, obviously, so when I got to the restaurant, I thought, “this isn’t too crowded. Maybe not everyone is here.”

About a half-hour later, our posse was still arriving– in droves. We took over the entire back section of the restaurant. It was awesome. 

Everyone is cramped at these long tables, everyone is talking at once, and it’s doubtful that any of us were actually listening to each other. We were just way too excited to all be together, and in one of Manhattan’s hottest restaurants, no less! 

That night, in my mind, was the perfect way to herald our arrival in New York City– Cuban food, drinks, girlfriends, and chatter. I wouldn’t have had it any other way.

 

 

2. Whether you attend the official conference sessions or not, you will get advice, you will get schooled, and you will get “tough love.” 

I barely had time, between stopping in the hallways to chat and catch up with amigas, to attend every session during the retreat. But, no worries! This event is all about Latina empowerment– and all about putting yourself and your needs first. For me, I needed those one-on-one chats, where the person I need to speak with has my full attention, and I can ask questions and we’re engaging each other. 

I got some sound, personalized advice from a financial guru right out in the hall (thanks, Francesca, for pulling me aside for that invaluable opportunity!), and he turned out to be an amazing man who is, himself, using his social power to effect positive change in the world. I’ll never forget my conversation with him.

During the retreat, one of my fellow health blogueras, Laura Termini, pulled me aside (that happened to me a lot last week!) and gave me some hard advice that I really needed to hear. She encouraged me to seize my potential and truly put it to use for the good of my mission. I can never thank her enough for lighting a fire under my feet! 😉

 

 

3. The United Nations is a global force for good that we all should be connecting and engaging with. They are awesome. 

When I heard we were getting an exclusive tour of the United Nations headquarters, I thought for sure it would be a stuffy, uninspired building with official seals stamped everywhere.

I could never have imagined it would be so beautiful, like visiting a museum or art gallery. The works of art that adorn these halls and majestic meeting rooms are an amazing testimony to the multicultural, multi-national mission that the U.N. promotes. Many works– ranging from paintings to murals, from tapestries to sculptures– have been donated by member nations. 

During an increasingly-hostile political climate in the U.S., which is seeing escalating vitriol towards people of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds, it was so reassuring to see firsthand how the U.N. embraces and promotes diversity, even in its décor.

 

4. International organizations, including the U.N., not only need to hear from us– they want to hear from us! 

During our briefing with officials that work with the U.N. at the Ford Foundation headquarters, we listened to speakers discuss the diverse issues that the U.N. is particularly concerned about– access to food, water, health care for all; education; sustainability, etc.

They repeatedly encouraged us to Tweet the U.N., especially during this week, which is the Social Good Summit and the U.N. is convening in New York City. The hashtag is #2030NOW, and the U.N. wants to motivate users to Tweet what they’d like to see happen by the year 2030.

I’m using my voice and my platform to make the public aware of how many Ob-Gyns are pressuring expectant parents of child with spina bifida or another condition, to abortThis is WRONG. When a parent makes an informed decision based on the perceived best interest of his/her family, that is one thing; but when a medical doctor entrusted with the care of mother and baby is insensitive to the vulnerable position that family is in, that is pure, unadulterated manipulation. Parents have the right to get impartial, objective but compassionate information from their health care providers about spina bifida, and all of their options. 

The fact that many medical doctors (Ob-Gyns, specifically, who will only deliver a baby and not go on to “treat” him/her) still push an aggressive agenda of eugenic abortion is a tragedy. It’s a tragedy, not from a pro-life or pro-choice perspective, but rather because the family is being deprived of knowing what’s possible for this child. 

So, if you agree that doctors coercing a family to abort is wrong, please join me in Tweeting and using the hashtag #2030Now to try to bring an end to eugenic abortions (in the U.S., too!) 

 

5. When you’re with familia, it doesn’t matter what you’re doing! You’ll have fun doing it. 

The Top Blogueras and the LATISM Sports Tennis Team were invited to the Billie Jean King USTA National Tennis Center (home of the U.S. Open!) to meet and play with a group of kids with Big Brothers, Big Sisters. Unfortunately, due to several buses breaking down, the children weren’t able to meet with us. :(

We were devastated that we all missed out on the opportunity to get together for some fun, but we did have some undisputed fun on the train ride over to the tennis center! 😉

Check out this short instagram video to see what I mean.

 

 

 

Well, that’s all for now in this edition of Holdin’ Out for a Hero. Please stay tuned as I’ll be working on another recap on the conference itself! Thanks a million, LATISM, for believing in me and choosing me to be among so many ladies that I admire and respect!

Hugs,

 

Laurita ♥